10 Plants You Can Trade for Other Plants in Your Garden

10 Plants You Can Trade for Other Plants in Your Garden

If you’re anything like me, you probably have a bit of a green thumb problem. I love gardening and I love trading plants with my friends and family. I can’t even count the number of times I’ve offered up another plant in exchange for one of my own. It’s an awesome community-building activity that feeds my love of nature and gardening.

If you’re like me, you probably have a bit of a green thumb problem. Trading plants with friends and family is a great way to get people to join you in the garden and feed your green thumb. It’s a win-win for everyone involved.

However, it can be tricky to know when you should offer another plant instead of trading with them. Here are a few simple guidelines to make sure you are giving the right plants for the right plants: * Don’t give plants that you don’t want. Even if you don’t care for it, it’s likely that your friend or family member cares for it as much as you do. It’s not fair to them to give them something they don’t want.

Don’t give plants that you’ve grown before.

If you’ve grown the plant before, you may be receiving it from someone else with the same care in mind.

* Make sure that any plants you want to trade for are in good condition.

It can be hard to tell if a plant is healthy or not, so it’s best to err on the safe side. If your plant isn’t thriving, offer a different one instead. Plants for trade

* Remember that there are many factors in play when it comes to gardening: sun exposure, water, soil type and more.

You should always try to match plants based on these factors (or at least make an offer).

**For example: I have a pumpkin plant that loves being watered morning and night while my friend has a cucumber plant that likes to be watered every few days–plant-for-plant would not work out as we would both end up neglecting each other’s plants!

Give orchids.

Orchids are a great plant to give if you don’t want them. They are very popular and easy to take care of, so you should find someone who wants them.

* Pay attention to where they live. You might have a plant that thrives in hot weather but your friend might not be able to keep up with the extra work. It could be the difference between giving orchids or succulents, depending on where they live.

* Think about what they already have. If they already have a lot of plants that require more water or sun, they won’t be interested in your cactus as a trade item.

Give bushes and shrubs.

One of the easiest plants to trade with is a bush or shrub like a hydrangea, azalea, or gardenia. These plants are beautiful and will add an instant pop of color to any yard. You can also offer up a smaller tree like a dogwood or flowering pear tree.

* Give houseplants.

Houseplants are typically small and easy to transport, which makes them great for trading among friends and family. You can find all sorts of varieties from ferns to cacti that would make fantastic trade fodder for other plants in your garden.

* Offer perennials instead of annual flowers.

Perennials are what we usually think of as “garden flowers.” They have beautiful blooms and come back year after year without needing to be replanted each season like annual flowers do. One perennial you may want to offer is sunflowers, which grow quickly and produce large blooms perfect for cutting into bouquets.

Give succulents.

Succulents are a great plant to trade with friends and family. These plants are low maintenance, so you can enjoy them for years to come. They also come in many shapes and sizes so there is a variety of succulents to choose from that are perfect for any garden.

* Unless you have a green thumb as green as mine, don’t trade your cacti or succulents.

If you want to trade your cacti or succulents, do not offer them up until the end of the conversation because these plants take a long time to live and grow.

* Think about what would thrive in the other person’s living space before trading with them. For example, if they live in Colorado, don’t give them plants that need lots of sunlight because they won’t be getting ample amounts of it.

10 Plants You Can Trade for Other Plants in Your Garden

Planting gardens is fun but also challenging work. I love gardening but I also love trading plants with my friends and family members! Trading plants has always been an awesome community-building activity but it can be tricky when deciding what to trade when someone offers up one of their own. Here’s how trading works: * Don’t offer something you dislike even if someone else likes it just as much as you do – It’s not fair! * Offer succulent plants – They’re low maintenance and come in many varieties which make them

Don’t give your more exotic carnivorous plants.

Don’t give plants that you don’t want. Even if you don’t care for it, it’s likely that your friend or family member cares for it as much as you do. It’s not fair to them to give them something they don’t want. Don’t give more exotic carnivorous plants like venus flytraps and pitcher plants in exchange for your common garden plants. They require a lot of care, attention, and knowledge compared to the ones you probably have in your garden.

Give epiphytes, cacti and succulent-like plants.

The plants you give should be epiphytes, cacti and succulent-like plants. These plants are low-maintenance, which means they require little water or maintenance. This is perfect for those who don’t have a green thumb and want to care for the plant a bit less than others. Additionally, these types of plants are making a comeback in the gardening world, so it’s likely your friend or family member will cherish the unusual plant.

Make sure you know what the other person wants before you offer.

It’s always important to make sure you know what the other person wants before you offer. You should ask what they’re looking for and what plants they already have, then offer them something that matches their specifications.

For example, if someone mentions that they need a plant with small flowers and bright colors, you might offer them some petunias or pansies. If they mention that they don’t want any plants with large leaves or high maintenance, steer clear of offering up your ferns or bonsai trees.

In order to ensure you are giving the right plants for the right plants, you need to know what your friends and family want. Ask them about the type of plant they want before making an offer and try to get a clear idea of the type of plant they want before making an offer.

Conclusion

If you’re looking for a great way to trade plants with your friends and neighbors, here are 10 plants you can offer to trade with other people in your garden.

Don’t give plants that you’ve grown before.

Only give orchids.

Give a bush or shrub.

Give succulents.

Don’t give exotic carnivorous plants.

Give epiphytes, cacti and succulent-like plants.

Make sure you know what the other person wants before you offer.

Don’t overwhelm them with so many options that they don’t know what they want.

Only offer one or two at a time.

Don’t be offended if they don’t want to swap with you.

This article is provided by https://www.provendernurseries.co.uk/products

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